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Epic adventure or epic fail? The family that tried to sail to England in a rubber boat

A young English family of five, desperate to visit a sick relative back home, attempts to sail from Australia in a rubber dinghy; instead they take a 6,500 kilometre, nine-month detour via Indonesia.
That is the absurd plot for Melbourne filmmaker Alessandro Frosali’s next project — but incredibly, it’s a true story.
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Rubber Ducky Really Ridiculous !

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King Island kelp-getters

Father and son Johann and Caelan Pretorius are a kelp-getting team who are often alone on the rugged — even jagged — southern tip of King Island.
Father and son are friendly and well-spoken, but Caelan’s neckerchief gives him the look of a bandit, and with Johann’s hair flying away in the harsh wind, it’s little wonder some travellers are wary of approaching them. “We’ve got big knives and . . . . .
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Pedal the Pond team break world record with 40-day Atlantic crossing

Four young men have completed an epic 3,000 mile journey across the Atlantic in a pedalo to help raise funds and awareness about mental health.
Henry Quinlan, Max Mossman, Paddy Johnson and Hector Turner left Gran Canaria on January 7th, and arrived to cheers in Antigua on Friday February 16th.
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How your worst fears stack up against reality

For those of us who can’t stand the thought of creepy crawlies or who jump at the sight of a shadow in the ocean, summer in Australia can be a challenging time.  Deadly snakes, sharks and spiders — you name it, we’ve got it.  But just how deadly are these creatures and how disproportionate is our fear of them? To find out we compiled a list of deaths commonly associated with summer.
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kim jong un scares me 😦 [Ed]

Lions maul ‘poacher’ to death in South Africa, leaving ‘his head and some remains’

Lions have killed and eaten a man believed to have been poaching animals in a South African nature reserve, leaving behind “his head and some remains”.
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Now that’s what I call true justice – obviously his head was no good 🙂 [Ed]

Dining goes sky-high with suspended restaurant

“gastronomic delights at a table suspended 50m in the air”

Dining in Auckland is about to be taken to new heights with some of the country’s best chefs serving gastronomic delights at a table suspended 50m in the air. Renowned Kiwi chefs Simon Gault and Gareth Stewart are among those involved in Dinner in the Sky, which sees 22 diners seated at a specially engineered table hoisted by crane over the city.  Diners board the platform at ground level and are strapped into seats with a harness with legs left dangling underneath. Guests are told to leave all belongings, apart from a camera or phone, on the ground.
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Donald Trump asks for Van Gogh painting, is offered gold toilet instead

Donald and Melania Trump wanted to borrow a Van Gogh painting from New York’s Guggenheim Museum, but have instead been offered a working solid-gold toilet made by an Italian artist, a report says.
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Is this for a VIPooo ? [Ed]

Space is open for business: NZ start-up successfully launches rocket

New Zealand has trumped Australia in the space race, with a spaceflight start-up successfully launching a rocket from its own launch pad on the North Island.
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Look out Kim Jong-un we are firing this right over the top of Australia and into your Bunker ! 🙂 [Ed]

Play Me, I’m Yours


Play Me, I’m Yours was first commissioned in Birmingham, UK in 2008. With 15 pianos located across the city for three weeks it is estimated that over 140,000 people played or listened to music from the pianos. Since then more than 1500 street pianos have been placed in 50 cities, which have been played and listened to by more than 10 million people worldwide. Each new city that commissions the artwork becomes part of this growing international legacy.
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Some Happy News at last ! – what a beautiful idea.[Ed]

North Korea missile launch alert sent by Japanese broadcaster NHK in error

Japan’s public broadcaster NHK issued a false alarm about a North Korean missile launch, just days after a similar gaffe caused panic in Hawaii, but it managed to correct the error within minutes.
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. . .and what would happen if it was Real ?

I am speechless – the second “Human Error” in a week . . .and we are worried about “Global Warming” ?? It’s only a matter of time and we’ll all get very very warm, very very quickly ! [Ed}

How a love of sailing helped Einstein explain the universe

“The then 18-year-old had just learnt to sail but . . . “

If the world’s most famous physicist Albert Einstein is any guide, modern-day scientists need to get out of the lab more and onto the water.
Around 1900, a cheeky Swiss patent clerk wrote to a friend about four scientific papers he had been working on in his spare time. He described them as revolutionary, claiming they would one day modify the “theory of space and time”.
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False ‘ballistic missile threat to Hawaii’ message sent to residents in error, US military says

The United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is launching a “full investigation” into a false wireless emergency alert that a ballistic missile was headed for Hawaii, the chairman of the commission says.
The alerts to Hawaii mobile users were issued at about 8.07am local time, saying “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL”.
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Seek immediate shelter in your bathtub!  Ooops. . . your State Authority mistakenly transmitted this alert due to human error!  Sorry Hawaii but you are a S*****hole Country anyway. . .goodbye!  I wonder how long before human error pushes the big Red Button? [Ed]

Cars that can automatically dial triple-0 after a crash become reality

Imagine your car could automatically call triple-0 after a crash, even if you were trapped or unconscious, and communicate your GPS location, the type of the accident and the number of people on board to emergency services.

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How well do you know the road rules? Take our quiz for a drive

Nothing makes blood boil quite like a motorist who doesn’t know what they’re doing behind the wheel.
Each week on Facebook, Queensland’s Department of Transport and Main Roads asks its followers for the solution to some everyday scenarios they may come across when behind the wheel.
Most get it right, but others need a refresher. And fast.
Now it’s your turn. We’ve taken the best questions and present them to you now.

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How they do things in QLD 🙂 (Ed)

Good news of 2017 you probably missed while worrying about nuclear war

8543688-3x2-700x467If you’ve been reading the news this year, we wouldn’t blame you for being curled in foetal position by the end of 2017.
They say history tends towards progress, but it can be hard to keep sight of this when we bear witness to violence and misery through a device that most of us carry 24/7. So to balance the doom and gloom, here are 12 good news stories you probably missed in 2017.

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French sailor Francois Gabart sets around the world in 42 days solo record

French sailor Francois Gabart has broken the record for sailing around the world alone, circumnavigating the planet in just 42 days and 16 hours.
That is more than six days faster than the last record, set by fellow Frenchman Thomas Coville last year.

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Stars shine on silo art in epic road trip

Grain silo art drive leaves mates starstruck
What do you get when two camera-crazy mates head off on a road trip? A glimpse of the grain silo art trail under the stars.
Grant Schwartzkopff and Tony Virgo captured these images of seven silos on a 500km, 10-hour drive one night in October.

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Cheap travel anywhere on Earth within an hour using new rocket.

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk says he plans to replace his current rocket fleet and capsules with a next-generation spacecraft that could be used to travel to the Moon, Mars, or around the Earth — cutting most long-distance Earth flights to just half an hour.

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World’s tallest sandcastle, standing at more than 16 metres, built in German city

Using almost 4,000 metric tonnes of sand, 19 sculptors have built a 16.68-metre tower featuring a number of famous landmarks to claim the world record for tallest sandcastle.

The team spent more than three weeks in the western German city of Duisburg working on the artwork, which includes a sandy replica of the Great Sphinx of Giza, Venice’s Rialto Bridge and the grave of Elvis Presley.

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Groundbreaking projects vying for one of Australia’s top science prizes.

Eureka Prize finalists show off Australian-grown science ingenuity — from new ways to protect us from sunburn to a stem cell pen for surgeons, 45 finalists with groundbreaking projects are vying for one of Australia’s top science prizes.
Where else but this sunburnt country would scientists invent a sticker that changes colour when you have had too much sun.

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Solo sailor arrives in Albany after historic Antarctic circumnavigation

Scores of supporters have welcomed Queensland sailor Lisa Blair back into Australia, capping off her 184-day journey around Antarctica.
Blair, 32, set off from Albany in Western Australia in January and is set to be named the first woman to circumnavigate Antarctica solo.

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Are we sleepwalking to World War III?

Australia is plunging headlong into catastrophe and we are utterly unprepared. In fact, we may be past the time when we can prepare.
The time-bomb is ticking and it will explode in our lifetimes. All certainty will be lost, our economy will be devastated, our land seized, our system of government upended. This isn’t mere idle speculation or the rantings of a doomsday cult, this is the warning from a man who has made it his life’s work to prepare for just this scenario. Admiral Chris Barrie was chief of Australia’s Defence Force between 1998 and 2002. He has seen war and sent troops into battle. Now, he says we are sleepwalking towards a conflict that will alter the world as we know it. Australia, he says, will be invaded. He fears for the country his grandchildren will inherit.

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The most powerful supercomputer in the Southern Hemisphere.

Tucked away inside a modest-looking building at the Australian National University is the most powerful supercomputer in the Southern Hemisphere.
Its high-performance computer, Raijin, is able to cope with enormous amounts of data. “We have over 50 petabytes of research data stored at NCI and a high-performance cloud,” NCI spokesperson Lucy Guest said. In digital storage terms, one petabyte is 1,000,000,000,000,000 bytes (one quadrillion bytes or 1,000 terabytes).
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Emirates Team New Zealand win the 35th America’s Cup

Peter Burling and Emirates Team New Zealand have won the 35th America’s Cup. Another dominant race win for Peter Burling and Emirates Team New Zealand in race nine of the America’s Cup Match, presented by Louis Vuitton, gave the Kiwi team victory on the Great Sound in Bermuda, sparking wild celebrations on board their America’s Cup Class (ACC) boat, and the team’s support boats on the Great Sound. Burling now adds the 35th America’s Cup to the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup trophy he won in San Francisco, 2013. The Kiwi team dominated the final stage of the 35th America’s Cup, winning eight races to ORACLE TEAM USA’s one race win, giving the New Zealanders a final winning scoreline of 7-1.

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